Julie's AC - Rec'd!


Since Julie messaged me (she liked it! she liked it!) that she's received her assemblage, I can now show it in its entirety.

Here's what Julie gave me to work with...


And this is what I came up with (caveat: Simon Sez was NOT to return home!)...




Remember, I'm always open for an Assemblage Challenge!

Next!

I was able to wrap up two things today.
The first was 10 Teeny Things ... all sent out and winging their way west and south. I hope the participants enjoy the contents. Once they've arrived I'll post full photos of all their hard work. Amazing stuff!

I also found (constructed actually) a large enough box for Julie's assemblage. I hope SHE likes it and her family don't find it too weird. For what it's worth Julie? I reigned in my weird as much as I could! lol

Now I'm moving on to my next Assemblage Challenge.... Lisa's stuff!

go home Arthur!


Hurricanes don't help with updates.
Go figure!

Here are some sneakpeeks until I can get organized.


miracle of miracles!

... many years ago I perfected my image transfer process using Epson photo paper.
And it was a beautiful thing. I created many of what I call my "scenics" using this process. Just about foolproof!
And then as is company's wont, Epson changed the formulation on their photo paper creating not a paper backing but a plastic backing. And everything went to hell and a hand basket.

I tried and tried and tried to recreate my earlier foolproof process. All for naught. It was a sad day in Jen Studio Land.

Until. This past weekend! I was in-between projects and decided to play and explore. I printed out a bunch of old photos/ephemera for future posterity and while I was waiting for the printer to be done, I was flicking the corner of a piece of the photo paper ...you know, fidget-style. And to my surprise, the filmy background peeled off. Whaaaaa???? Well,  you know I grabbed the gel medium and went to work!

Here, then, a mini tutorial on creating image transfers Jen style!


  1. Apply 3 layers of gel medium to inkjet print, drying after each layer. (I smooth the medium with my finger)
  2. Peel the thin plastic layer backing of photo paper, leaving the papery backing.
  3. Using gel medium, glue your transfer image side down to your substrate.* Burnish WELL and let dry overnight. (trust me on this, as one who is VERY impatient, you need that solid bond of overnight drying!)
  4. Pick at the edge to find the plastic film (top layer of photo paper). Peel back.Gently! (and here's *why* you wait overnight ... if it isn't well bonded, your image won't have adhered well to your substrate!)
  5. Voila! Your finished image transfer with just the ink/gel medium concoction on your substrate. No nasty plastic anywhere in sight!
*This is the ONLY caveat ... smooth substrates make the best transfers. I tried on old(ish) paper and ended up with a disaster. Newer paper? Not a problem! Wood? Same! My next experiment will be with canvas and I'll let you know how that goes.

If you have any questions ... specific supplies or techniques... let'em rip. I'm an open book. And if you do try this, let me know how it goes!

working. playing.

Yesterday, I experienced my first ever Art Play Date.  A one-on-one with a new Bridgewater resident, Chris was jonesing for some creative companionship. We drank tea, got to know one another and made some ATCs. It was lovely.

She also brought me a box of things for the Assemblage Challenge. AND cross-challenged me so I gave her a box too. (which of course I forgot to photograph. doh!) Here though are Chris' things:

The brain wheels are a turning ... those hand grenade balloons are giving me pause.

I'm also oh! so close on finishing Julie's assemblage. I'm pretty pleased with it. Lots of multi-layered meanings. Which I think is always a Good Thing. I need to let it sit for a day or two and see if it needs anything else. After taking this photograph for example, I felt it needed some more red to tie in the halo. Totally makes a difference.


Another thing on my table ... starting to receive participants creations for Ten Teeny Things. uhm. Can you say squee?!?

A riff off of previous swaps, 20Things and 20Things zine, on a request to do another I just wasn't up for wrangling 20 people. I could manage10 though and came up with the idea to create something that could fit into a small matchbox and Ten Teeny Things was born.

The talent of this group is nothing short of astounding and so far, are really varied 'things'. I'll post photos when all have been swapped out/received. So much fun!

more wips

Work in Progress - detail

This assemblage is moving along nicely! 
So how do I move from a box of mainly plastic toys to this, you ask? My process for all the Assemblage Challenges has been pretty similar. Given how varied the items are, I think that's kind of interesting.

I start by going through each and every component, checking all sides, any bits and bobs that are attached, the heft, their "feel". Through this process I find something usually jumps out at me ... the curve of an old instrument part, the weight of a ball, multiples of something... and that's my starting point.

For this one, after examining all the dinosaurs, farm animals and novelty bits, I noticed that one of the little plastic bird caricatures had a snippet of scripture embossed on the back referencing Psalm IX-1 "I will tell ... things you have done". Paraphrased I learned, as the actual quote is: "I WILL give thanks unto Jehovah with my whole heart;I will show forth all thy marvellous works."

But the simplified version immediately made me think of a merit award and because Julie pretty much rocks the free world in my eyes, having accomplished what I could not, namely crossing the IM finish line, I knew that a sort of trophy-esque assemblage would be appropriate. Something tall and hefty. Stacking the animals gave me the height I was looking for and I ran with it from there.
Work in Progress - assemblage box
There are many components to this assemblage. I'd hoped that I could get the Christmas lights working but that didn't happen. But I did like the red disc shape, a perfect fit for one of those LED 'candle' things. Yay! Light up structures! I'd planned on using knobs as feet but the top heaviness of the box+animal tower needed something more substantial. Enter ceramic candle holder turned upside. Perfect!

There have been numerous additions since then and I'll save those for another day.
I'm getting close though. So very close!

progress, work in


Not so long ago I was in a discussion about artistic criticism, whether it bothered me to have my work analyzed, critiqued, held up for display, and I replied that no, in fact, once a work was completed, I had very little attachment to it and if someone didn't like it or felt it was "less than" or otherwise criticized  it I was rather ambivalent.

I did ...and do... however say that I rarely, if ever, show my work in progress. And if I did/do, it was after the fact. Rather once the piece was completed only then would I post photos of the work in progress.

But.

I've been thoroughly enjoying Scott Rolfe's work evolve as he posts his assemblage pieces  while he constructs them. And I wonder, maybe, if there is more than meets the eye than simply feeling vulnerable in this construction phase. Perhaps by laying it all out here in "black and white" comes a clarity or focus to see things 'as they really are'. A sort of visual aid to where the stumbling blocks might be and how to overcome them. Maybe? Perhaps?!?

Here then, is Julie's Stuff in progress. Albeit a highly stylized version since I am  obviously not completely convinced that this process might work! If the visual confounds, ponder the Town Musicians of Bremen, Psalms IX-1, evolution plus achievement trophy and you might get the gist of where I'm headed. heh.

Your comments are welcome. But please be kind: there is an artist's ego involved! xo

spring tonic

While at other times of the year this rhododendron canadense might go unnoticed or even seem a bit flouncy. Floozy even. but when coming off 6 ...SIX... months of browns and greys her pink and acid green give the same benefit as a Spring tonic.

I'm working with Julie's stuff these days. Slow going as there are many parts to figure out. I always say that Assemblage is all about problem solving ...ie. how this piece will be attached to that... and given the multitude of pieces the assembling part is taking awhile. I hope you aren't in any rush Julie!

god is in the details


every day I ...we... walk these woods.
Spring is subtle here.
one has to look for the changes.

but once attuned, they are everywhere.
 






smitten kitten

sometimes I become obsessed with people. their vision. and their art.
I can't get enough. unquenched. need for more.

these two do not disappoint.

Ines Seidel - http://ines-seidel.de/









... swoon

and artist nichole rae [http://nicholeraedesign.com] who I discovered in my own neck of the woods.
her words.
her pov.











who's inspiring YOU lately?